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MBY 546:1-5 Betrothal and marriage MBY 547:1-12 Death and burial and MBY 548:1-20 Mourning (abridged)
MBY 546:1-5 Betrothal and marriage MBY 547:1-12 Death and burial and MBY 548:1-20 Mourning (abridged)

Ed. For the remainder of the halachos of Ch”H, we will address the issues briefly and by quoting from Rabbi Zucker and Francis’ sefer. They relate to life-cycle events on Ch”H and are generally dealt with in consultation with a Rav. We will just outline some of the major principles and leave the rest to him!

MBY 546:1-5 Betrothal and marriage (abridged) Excerpted from Hilchos Chol Hamoed Zichron Shlomo, by Rabbis Zucker and Francis, pp. 115-117:
“The principle of ‘Ein m’arvin simcha b’simcha’ (“We may not intermingle one joyous occasion with another”) requires that two major joyous events (relating to mitzvos) should not be celebrated simultaneously, so that they will not interfere with and detract from one another. Thus, one may not marry on Ch”H, so that the joy of the marriage will not detract from the joy of the festival or vice versa… One is permitted to marry before the festival even though the ‘shivas yemei ha-mishteh’ (seven days of feasting) will coincide with several days of the festival. In accordance with custom, however, one should not marry on Erev Yom Tov… Although marriages are prohibited on Ch”H, engagements are permitted… The performances of ‘bris milah’ (circumcision) and ‘pidyon haben’ (redemption of the first born) may be celebrated with their customary meals on Ch”H. A feast held in honor of a ‘siyum’ (the completion of studying certain sections of Torah, e.g. a tractate of Talmud) is also permitted.”

MBY 547:1-12 Death and burial and MBY 548:1-20 Mourning (abridged) Excerpted from Hilchos Chol Hamoed Zichron Shlomo, by Rabbis Zucker and Francis, pp. 119-124:
“In keeping with the joyous nature of the festival, certain laws and customs pertaining to death and mourning are modified or suspended on Ch”H. The nature and extent of these changes are the subject of this chapter… When interment is made on Yom Tov or Ch”H, the usual laws of shiva are not observed until the conclusion of the festival…The customary laws of shiva are not practiced after interment on the festival in order to preserve the joyous nature of the festival. Thus, throughout the festival, the mourner wears festival clothing including leather shoes, sits on a regular chair and retains his regular seat in the synagogue… Although no overt display of mourning is permitted during the festival, laws of mourning which pertain to private matters remain in effect… Despite the fact that public display of mourning is prohibited during the festival, one may visit the home of a mourner on Ch”H in order to fulfill the mitzvah of ‘nichum aveilim’ (comforting the bereaved).”

That’s all for now. May the day come soon when the words of the Navi - “May death be swallowed up forever, and may Hashem wipe away the tears from all faces” - will be our reality!

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